Des Moines Health News and Tips

Des Moines Health news

for ...
caffeine content of common foods and drinks

How much caffeine you are consuming each day? (With a soda here and a snack there, you may be more "wired" than you realized!)

By DesMoinesHealth.com writers. Read disclaimer.

From the biggest cities to the smallest towns, North Americans reach for their morning caffeine fix. Though a cup or two a day isn't likely to harm your health (200 to 300 milligrams of caffeine), once you get up to the four to seven cup range, you could be heading for trouble.

If you have more than 500 to 600 milligrams (mg) of caffeine a day, you may experience anything from restlessness, anxiety and insomnia to headaches and stomachaches. But caffeine doesn't just come in coffee. Use the charts below to evaluate your daily caffeine intake.

Coffee and tea Caffeine (mg)
Dunkin' Donuts, brewed, 16 oz 143-206
Generic brewed coffee, 8 oz 95-200
Generic brewed coffee, decaffeinated, 8 oz 2-12
Generic instant coffee, 8 oz 27-173
Generic instant coffee, decaffeinated, 8 oz 2-12
Starbucks Espresso, 1 oz 58-75
Starbucks Vanilla Latte, 16 oz 150
Black tea, 8 oz 40-120
Black tea, decaffeinated, 8 oz 2-10
Starbucks Tazo Chai Tea Latte, 16 oz 100
Stash Premium Green, 6 oz 26
Soft drinks Caffeine (mg)
Coca-Cola Classic 35
Coca-Cola Zero 35
Diet Coke and Diet Coke With Lime 47
Dr Pepper, regular or diet 42-44
Pepsi, regular or diet 36-38
Sports or energy drinks Caffeine (mg)
Monster Energy, 16 oz 160
No Fear, 8 oz 83
Red Bull, 8.3 oz 76
Rockstar, 8 oz 80
Candy and ice cream Caffeine (mg)
Foosh Energy Mints, 1 mint 100
Hershey's Milk Chocolate bar, 1.55 oz 9
Hershey's Special Dark Chocolate bar, 1.45 oz 31
Ben and Jerry's Coffee Heath Bar Crunch, 8 oz 84
Haagen-Dazs Coffee ice cream, 8 oz 58
Starbucks Coffee ice cream, 8 oz 50-60
Medication Caffeine (mg)
Anacin, Maximum Strength, 2 tablets 64
Excedrin, Extra Strength, 2 tablets 130
NoDoz, Maximum Strength, 1 tablet
200
Chart credits: mayoclinic.com

buy pureformulas vitaminspureformulas discounts

Latest Des Moines health news:

Summary of Des Moines Health topics being discussed here:

  • In addition to cofee, sources of caffeine may include medications, candy, ice cream and soft drinks.

  • Natural energy boosters can include sun exposure, eating a healthy breakfast and brief periods of physical activity.
From the Des Moines Health Research Desk...

If fatigue and lack of motivation are your constant companions, put these natural energy boosters to work for you.

Begin with breakfast -- This isn't the first time you've heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day -- and that's because it really is! Fuel your body with whole grains and protein to start your day out right.

Exercise for energy -- Exercise can add some zing to your day. In one study, 20 minutes of low-intensity aerobic activity three times a week increased energy levels by 20% and decreased fatigue by 65%. Not only that, but exercise can boost your overall mood as well as help you fall asleep and have a better quality of sleep.

Power up with a power nap -- A 10-minute nap can help restore wakefulness, and promote performance and learning. Avoid napping longer than 30 minutes, as it can adversely affect your nighttime sleep.

Bag the boredom -- Long hours at a desk or at a single task can lead to boredom, which fosters fatigue. Every hour, stand up and stretch or take a short walk around the office to shake off the drowsiness.

natural energizersKeep the fluids flowing -- Drinking loads of water is not only beneficial for your health, but it also can act as a fatigue-buster. Dehydration is a common culprit behind fatigue, and has also been shown to decrease alertness and concentration.

Plug the electronic energy leak -- Keeping up-to-date on your emails, texts, phone calls and everything electronic can sap your brain's energy. For a few hours each day, shut off your cell phone and unessential gadgetry. You'll be amazed at how much more productive you can be -- as well as much more energized.

Seek out the sun -- Getting some sunshine early in the morning -- right when you wake up is best -- can help your body set its sleep-wake cycle for the day. Seeing sunlight during the day can also give your energy a boost.

Lighten your load -- Having too much on your plate can lead to overwork and burnout. Learn to say "no" and schedule some downtime.

Cut the (refined) carbs -- To avoid fatigue-inducing (not to mention unhealthy) blood sugar fluctuations, try eating more whole grains and complex carbohydrates (think: vegetables), and fewer refined carbs like pasta, rice and white bread.

Healthy Cooking Tips...
diabetes pesticide link

Link between pesticide exposure and diabetes

Helsinki, Finland - Overweight and obese people with higher blood levels of certain pesticides, PCBs and other chemicals (referred to as "persistent organic pollutants", or POPs), have a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes than those with lower levels, say researchers from Finland's National Institute for Health and Welfare.

Banned or restricted POPs remain in the environment, and build up in human and animal body fat. POPs have been linked to diabetes in past studies. In the current study, close to 2,000 people had their blood measured for several POPs; about 15% of those tested had diabetes. The higher the POP levels, the higher the risk of diabetes, though this link was stronger in the overweight and obese. People with levels in the top 10% were twice as likely to have diabetes as those in the bottom 10%.

eat slower to lose weight
Eating slower makes you feel fuller longer, but snacks tempt

Maastricht, Netherlands - Researchers at the University of Maastricht in the Netherlands found that while eating slowly made people feel fuller longer, it didn't prevent them from snacking.

The study involved 38 volunteers who ate the same lunch. One day they ate in 30 minutes, and the other day they ate in two hours. Scientists took blood samples before, during and after the meals to measure hormones involved in hunger and satiety (the feeling of fullness). Participants who ate slower had a slower in hormones that signal satiety, and two and a half hours after eating rated their satiety higher and their hunger lower than those who ate in 30 minutes. However, they ate just as many snacks as those who ate faster. Researchers suggest the availability of snack foods trumps body's hunger cues.

Even 15 minutes of daily exercise may help you live longer

15 minutes of exerciseTaipei, Taiwan - Exercising a minimum of 15 minutes per day or 90 minutes per week may extend your lifespan, regardless of age, sex and existing cardiovascular disease risk, it was reported in The Lancet.

Though experts recommend 30 minutes a day, researchers at the National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan wanted to determine if less exercise still offers life expectancy benefits. Over 400,000 participants were categorized as inactive, or low, medium, high, or very highly active. They were followed for an average of eight years and based on lifestyle, researchers projected life expectancy for each group.

Compared to the inactive group, those in the low activity group had a 14% reduced risk of all causes of death and a 3- year longer life expectancy. Each additional 15 minutes of daily exercise further reduced the risk of death by 4%.

Today's World Health News...
L.A. Times - Health
L.A. Times - Health
Headlines from Los Angeles Times

08/22/2014 06:30 PM
Homework for parents as school starts
Summer vacation is over. Not great news if you're a kid. But some of you parents may feel more than ready to send your charges back to school. But are you? Are you really? Here are a few things to consider.
08/22/2014 06:00 PM
At SRF World Convocation, meditation and solidarity come into focus
One recent Sunday evening, the ballroom at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel in downtown Los Angeles was filled with about 3,000 people in quiet meditation.
08/22/2014 03:30 PM
How Lou Ferrigno stays Hulk-ripped at 62
Bodybuilder-actor Lou Ferrigno has remained true to form. It's been decades since he was a two-time Mr. Universe and starred as an enraged green behemoth in the “Incredible Hulk” TV series and movies, but you wouldn't know it by the 62-year-old's still-spectacular proportions. He'll...
08/22/2014 03:00 PM
Tension Releasing Exercises shake loose 'therapeutic tremors'
I've been running for 30 years and lucky enough to avoid an iliotibial band injury until this year. But my luck ran out a few weeks back, and the physical therapist has banned many kinds of workouts for a while. That seemed the perfect time to try something called TRE, or Tension Releasing...
08/15/2014 03:30 PM
Food buyers lean toward 'natural,' a claim that's hard to define
When you buy a box of crackers labeled "natural," do you just assume they're organic? Don't. When you choose an "all natural" chocolate syrup for your kids' ice cream, are you thinking it has less sugar? Read the label.
BBC News - Health
BBC News - Health
The latest stories from the Health section of the BBC News web site.

08/27/2014 02:58 AM
Nigeria closes schools over Ebola
Nigerian schools are ordered to remain shut, delaying the new academic year until 13 October as part of measures to prevent the spread of Ebola.
08/27/2014 01:01 AM
Hormone 'protects premature babies'
The hormone erythropoietin (EPO) could prevent brain injuries in very premature babies, a study suggests.
08/26/2014 06:33 AM
'Ban E-cig use indoors,' says WHO
The World Health Organization says there should be regulations preventing the use of electronic cigarettes indoors in public and work places.
08/26/2014 09:25 AM
UK Ebola patient gets test drug
The British volunteer nurse William Pooley, who contracted Ebola while working in Sierra Leone, has been given the experimental drug ZMapp.
08/26/2014 05:04 PM
Overseas nurses 'face shorter tests'
New rules mean nurses and midwives who have completed their training outside Europe will face shorter tests to check they are fit to work in the UK.
08/26/2014 04:55 AM
Ebola: 'heavy toll' on health staff
An "unprecedented" number of doctors and nurses have been infected with Ebola virus in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization.
08/22/2014 11:20 AM
Experts to review stroke clot-buster
The UK medicines watchdog is setting up a review to look at the safety of alteplase, a clot-busting drug often used to treat strokes.
08/21/2014 04:31 PM
Double vaccines 'could end polio'
Using both types of polio vaccine could speed up efforts to free the world of the crippling and potentially fatal disease, research suggests.
08/20/2014 05:18 PM
Botox may have cancer fighting role
Botox injections - beloved by those seeking a wrinkle-free complexion - may help fight cancer, early animal studies suggest.
Health - Chicago Tribune
Health - Chicago Tribune
Headlines from Chicago Tribune

08/26/2014 01:50 PM
U.S. says non-allergic peanut moves closer to commercial reality
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A new method for removing allergens from peanuts means help could soon be on the way for the roughly 2.8 million Americans with a potentially life-threatening allergy to the popular food, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Tuesday.







08/26/2014 10:52 AM
More parents think their overweight child is 'about right'
Between 1988 and 2010, the number of parents who could correctly identify their children as overweight or obese went down, according to a new study.







08/26/2014 06:42 AM
WHO urges stiff regulatory curbs on e-cigarettes
The World Health Organization stepped up its war on "Big Tobacco" on Tuesday, calling for stiff regulation of electronic cigarettes as well as bans on indoor use, advertising and sales to minors.







08/26/2014 05:20 AM
Navigating Robin Williams' suicide with young adults
As a parent of maturing children, I find few conversations more difficult to navigate than those involving sex, drugs and alcohol. Add to the list now Robin Williams and suicide.

08/25/2014 07:02 PM
Medical marijuana could reduce painkiller abuse, study suggests
Could medical marijuana be an antidote for the nation's scourge of fatal overdoses caused by prescription pain medication? A new study suggests the answer is yes, and it's set off a flurry of medical debate over the risks and benefits of making cannabis more widely available to patients.

08/25/2014 03:16 PM
Exclusive: U.S. approval of Merck cancer immunotherapy expected soon
U.S. regulators are likely to approve Merck & Co's highly anticipated immuno-oncology drug, pembrolizumab, as a treatment for melanoma well ahead of a late October deadline, according to three sources familiar with the situation.







We welcome your Feedback...
 
Add new comment
Comments are moderated. Please expect a delay.
 

feedback
news@DesMoinesHealth.com

Copyright 2014 DesMoinesHealth.com. All rights reserved.

Information provided on this site is for educational purposes only and should not be relied on to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease or condition. We are not a substitute for professional medical advice. If you have a health condition or concern, please consult a physician or health care provider. DesMoinesHealth.com is a commercial website and not associated with any government agency, university or private medical facility. COMPENSATION DISCLOSURE: A relationship may exist between this web site and the products or services advertised here. Read our Terms of use | Privacy policy

pureformulas vitamins